Foggy Bottom breakdown

Another interesting entry in the ridey.net webserver logs reveals that somebody at the US State Department (in particular, sherman.state.gov – isn’t it quaint how they name their servers after old generals and presidents? we’ve also been visited by buchanan.state.gov) spent about two minutes perusing this weblog. They arrived via a Google search for “Bush’s Bad Science”, and I’m quite proud that we come third in the results, just behind the Washington Post, thanks to an item I had posted about an article in the Nation written by Robert F Kennedy Jr. The State Department visitor also read this item, which was about their boss.

Return of the creepy crawler

Looking through the server logs this evening, I noticed that 63.148.99.245 had rifled through nearly every page on ridey.net. It didn’t leave any calling card in the log entry the way that well-mannered visitors do – eg, Googlebot/2.1 (+http://www.googlebot.com/bot.html), which made me curious enough to plug 63.148.99.245 into dnsstuff.com to see who was so interested in me. Turns out it was our old friends at Cyveillance. Just as rude as we remember them. Wonder if they’ve been round Chris’s place again, too? And wonder what they made of Chris’s entry about what he has on his iPod?

I think they’re coming from Kathmandu

Early this morning, before I left for work, I was sitting at the iMac and noticed one of my Konfabulator widgets, called Who’s There?, was detecting traffic on the network. Nothing odd there, considering the iMac is both a web server and mail server, among other things. But this was not incoming mail or a visitor to this weblog. Who’s There? showed a machine with the IP number 202.51.64.144 was furiously trying to connect to my Samba server (aka Windows File Sharing), which allows Windows PCs to join my network. I checked the IP on DNS Stuff, and it resolved to something called Communications & Communicate Nepal, based in Kathmandu! When I turned off Windows File Sharing, the connection from 202.51.64.144 disappeared. As soon as I turned it on again, it came back almost instantly.

Needless to say, Windows File Sharing is going to stay off pending further investigations. I suspect it must have something to do with the Sasser worm that is spreading around the world at the moment, creating havoc for Windows PC users. Alarmingly, for us smug, “we are immune to viruses” Mac users, I found evidence that we, too, can fall victim to these malevolent worms when we have Windows File Sharing enabled.